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Tuesday Tech Tip: Web Albums Revisited

It’s getting close to June, and the time to start packing up classrooms is near.  As you’re thinking about what to do with those paper files, you can also think about what to do with those big digital files.   Why not take them with you wherever you go?

Why online photo storage makes sense:

  • Your photos are safe.
  • Your photos are accessible from anywhere you have an internet connection.
  • You can decide how to share your photos and entire albums.
  • Your files aren’t taking up space on your hard drive.

Sounds like GoogleDocs, right?

Here’s a quick video about online photo sharing.  And here is a slightly updated version of how to use Picasa 3 to organize photos and upload them to Picasa Web Albums.

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Tuesday Tech Tip: Copyright Friendly Music

It’s May and that means end-of-the-year projects and assemblies!  Students and teachers are creating multimedia projects to share in the classroom, in the school, and with the world.  I wanted to pass along some good resources for copyright friendly music and project creation tools that have soundtracks built in.

From the FAQ on Soundzabound (abridged):

Q: Someone once told me that we can legally use 30 seconds of copyrighted music for our school projects or presentations. Is this true?

A: You may use 10% of a copyrighted piece of music for face-to-face instruction directly related to your course content. Acknowledging the source of the copyrighted material does not substitute for obtaining permission.

Q: I purchased a song legally from iTunes. Can I not use it in my video at school?

A: No. You purchased the song for home and personal use, not for public or educational use. You do not own the rights to the music; the copyright holder(s) own the rights to the material.

Q: What about for educational use?

A: The Fair Use Guidelines for Education were written in 1997 and have become antiquated by the digital age. Technology is moving too quickly, and the guidelines have not been re-visited in all these years.  It is best that 10% of the material used is for related course content, and conducted face-to-face in a classroom setting. By synchronizing with video, PowerPoint, pod-casting, broadcasting, or putting on a website, you are subjecting yourself to a lawsuit.

So what are a teacher and student to do?  There are a growing number of resources available that come with their own library of licensed tunes.  Use the entire song, use them for public performances, use them for broadcasting online, use them freely—permission is already granted!

Animoto and Photostory have their own built in libraries with hundreds of choices.

Websites like freeplaymusic, Incompetech, and ccmixter have thousands of songs with various lengths, themes, and styles.

Soundzabound is another great resource.  It’s available through BadgerLink.  Because the state purchased a license so that teachers and students can download all the music, you need to access it through BadgerLink.  Just going to soundzabound.com isn’t going to tell them you’re from Wisconsin.  Here’s how to get there.

DeForest home page >> For Students >> Student Learning Links >> BadgerLink (toward the top of the page) >> Soundzabound (under ECB VideoLink)

 

This week’s winner is Bill Porter who completed the TED-Ed flipped video!

Tuesday Tech Tip: Search Tools

While “Google” is now a noun and a verb, most people don’t regularly use Google Search to its fullest potential.   Here are a few tips on how to use Advanced Search to sort your results by reading level and by copyright license.

Here’s a quick video overview of Google Search

A Google A Day:  It’s a daily search task to sharpen skills… give it a try!

A well-recommended kid-friendly search engine: Duck Duck Go

WolframAlpha is also an excellent reference and computational search engine.  Here’s a few ideas for using it.

One more… If you’re a fan of Calvin and Hobbes, you’ve got to try this.

Today’s Technology Tip: a Teaching Tool and a Tablet Tip

A teaching tool:

60in60.  A nice wiki with a ton of ideas.  There’s a cheat sheet at the bottom of the home page if you’d like “60 in less than 60.”

A tablet tip:
Mobile devices are audio recording devices, among other things, and have the capability of translating speech to text (and vice versa).  Why might this be useful?

  • For capturing a note or composing an email quickly.
  • To search the web without using the touch keyboard.
  • For students with difficulties writing or keyboarding—if they can speak their ideas, their hands don’t get in the way of their thinking.

Android:

    • The keyboard includes voice.  Anything you can type, you can speak:  Google searches, Twitter, Note Everything (a nice note-taking app), Evernote…
    • Google Translate will translate text to speech, even English to English.

iPad apps:

    • Google Search
    • Dragon Dictation: speech to text
    • iSpeech TTS: text to speech

Difficulties with accuracy?  Speak clearly and slowly with good volume, and no gum.
Difficulties connecting to wireless?  Here’s the scoop.
Need more ideas for how and when to use your device?  Ask a colleague; most of the best learning comes from sharing!

**Last week’s TED winner is Kate Boyce, who plans to use TED talks with her seniors on C days!

Have an idea for a tip?  Please let me know!!

Chrome!

You may have noticed the recent return of an old friend from the beginning of the school year–Chrome!  It fast became the preferred browser for lots of good reasons, especially because it makes GoogleApps function to it’s fullest.

Here are a few tips to get you started.  Set Chrome as your default browser, import your bookmarks from IE or Firefox, dress it up with themes, and more!  Like with Gmail, you can customize Chrome.   And no matter where you go, your Chrome preferences and settings will follow you.

Here’s something other browsers can’t offer… Apps!  Here’s how it works:

Look for more tips and tricks for Chrome in the coming weeks.

What I like about GoogleApps

The final Norski Ninja tip really isn’t a tip at all… it’s a chance for you to share and learn from each other.  To do that, we’re using a Google Form so you can see how it works.

Over the course of the past two months, we’ve done a lot:

  • we’ve moved from Groupwise to Gmail
  • we’ve integrated Google Calendar to sign up for labs and other common areas
  • we’ve shared Docs to collaborate on projects
  • we’ve used Google Forms to collect data
  • and more!

An example of a Google Form is here… a place for you to submit What I like about GoogleApps.  This is the front-end survey your respondents will see.  Feel free to fill it out as many times as you’d like!

We’ve shared the form with all of you, so if you open your Google Docs home page, you’ll see the back-end data collection in a spreadsheet.  This is where you’ll see everyone’s responses.  Next week, we’ll randomly choose some prize winners!

Click the Go Google! tab at the top of this page to see all the Norski Ninja tips, links, and How-To’s for going Google!


Connecting to Wireless

We’ve been getting plenty of questions about connecting to wireless. Here are a couple of handouts and tips for making it easier to connect:

Connecting to DeForest-Guest: This network is for student devices and devices used by students. Find the DeForest-Guest network and connect >> Open a Browser >> If you don’t see I Accept Terms, click/press Refresh >> Accept. You should see the DeForest web page and then you are connected. Wireless Guest Access

Connecting Your Xoom to DASD-1

Connecting Your iPad/iPod to DASD-1