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Tuesday Tech Tip: Copyright Friendly Music

It’s May and that means end-of-the-year projects and assemblies!  Students and teachers are creating multimedia projects to share in the classroom, in the school, and with the world.  I wanted to pass along some good resources for copyright friendly music and project creation tools that have soundtracks built in.

From the FAQ on Soundzabound (abridged):

Q: Someone once told me that we can legally use 30 seconds of copyrighted music for our school projects or presentations. Is this true?

A: You may use 10% of a copyrighted piece of music for face-to-face instruction directly related to your course content. Acknowledging the source of the copyrighted material does not substitute for obtaining permission.

Q: I purchased a song legally from iTunes. Can I not use it in my video at school?

A: No. You purchased the song for home and personal use, not for public or educational use. You do not own the rights to the music; the copyright holder(s) own the rights to the material.

Q: What about for educational use?

A: The Fair Use Guidelines for Education were written in 1997 and have become antiquated by the digital age. Technology is moving too quickly, and the guidelines have not been re-visited in all these years.  It is best that 10% of the material used is for related course content, and conducted face-to-face in a classroom setting. By synchronizing with video, PowerPoint, pod-casting, broadcasting, or putting on a website, you are subjecting yourself to a lawsuit.

So what are a teacher and student to do?  There are a growing number of resources available that come with their own library of licensed tunes.  Use the entire song, use them for public performances, use them for broadcasting online, use them freely—permission is already granted!

Animoto and Photostory have their own built in libraries with hundreds of choices.

Websites like freeplaymusic, Incompetech, and ccmixter have thousands of songs with various lengths, themes, and styles.

Soundzabound is another great resource.  It’s available through BadgerLink.  Because the state purchased a license so that teachers and students can download all the music, you need to access it through BadgerLink.  Just going to soundzabound.com isn’t going to tell them you’re from Wisconsin.  Here’s how to get there.

DeForest home page >> For Students >> Student Learning Links >> BadgerLink (toward the top of the page) >> Soundzabound (under ECB VideoLink)

 

This week’s winner is Bill Porter who completed the TED-Ed flipped video!

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Tuesday Tech Tip: TED-Ed!

As you know, I’m a fan of TED.  But even if I weren’t, I’d definitely pass this along… TED-Ed has launched a website that has some really great possibilities

There you’ll find the tools to:

  • Watch great educational videos, created by teachers and animators.
  • Nominate a fellow educator!
  • Each TED-Ed video has a supplementary lesson…
    • Take a multiple choice Quick Quiz while watching the video (with video hints!)
    • Find open-ended questions in the Think section.
    • Dig Deeper to find more resources
    • Save your answers

But here’s the coolest part… you can “flip” any lesson!

  • Customize the quizzes, write your own open-ended questions, and modify the resources.
  • Grab your finished lesson’s unique web address and share it with students.
  • Track your students’ work.
  • You can flip any video from YouTube using the TED-Ed platform, including ones you create!

Watch the tour:

Want to win a prize?  Create an account and participate in my flipped lesson here!

Tuesday Tech Tip: Quietube

Today’s Tip comes from Ashley Nowak at EPES.  She shared a nice tool for watching YouTube videos:  Quietube.  It’s a tool to remove all the distractions like comments, related videos, etc., and especially nice for projecting videos in the classroom.  Here’s an example.

The thing I like best is that there’s a Chrome extension for it.  Just install it in your Chrome browser and whenever you’re on a page with a video (Vimeo, YouTube, etc.) you’ll see a circle in the address bar.  Click it and viola!  You can even link to this page instead of the original video if you’re sharing the video with others.

(image credit: Dominic’s Pics via Flickr)

Tuesday Tip: TED


Yesterday, the TED-Ed YouTube channel was launched.  Here’s the scoop.

Not only can you consume TED content, you can create it.  TED-Ed is an invitation to educators, including you!

The biannual TED conference was held a few weeks ago in Long Beach, CA.  TED was created in 1984 as a place for “Ideas Worth Spreading” in the areas of Technology, Entertainment, and Design.  It has since broadened its scope to include science, education, innovation, creativity, culture, and more.

Speakers are invited to give “the talk of their lives” in 18 minutes or less.  There are over 900 TEDtalks available for free and include speakers from Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Al Gore to 12-year-old app developer Thomas Suarez and 10-year-old Adora Svitak talking about what adults can learn from kids.  Ken Robinson’s legendary talk about creativity in schools has been viewed 11 million times, with 10,000 views added each day.

TED Wish: Each year, $1,000,000 is granted to someone with “a wish to change the world” Watch Jamie Oliver and Dave Eggers’ talks about their wishes for kids.

It goes without saying, there’s a few TED apps out there as well.

Why not share some of these fascinating talks with students?  What sort of discussion might they have about these big ideas?

Why not share some of these fascinating talks with colleagues?  Add a comment here with a favorite TED talk of your own.  It’ll also enter you in this week’s prize drawing… you know the drill.  🙂

Professional Development Sign-Up

Once again, we’ll be using Moodle for Professional Development sign-ups.

Most of you have already logged into Moodle, but for those who haven’t or if you need a reminder, we have a couple of helpers for you:

For our veteran Moodle users, here’s the short story. Login and look for DeForest Area School District >> Professional Development >> Inservice Sign-Up. We are using  Choice activities for each type of professional development. Select & Save Choice to sign up. 

If you need help logging in, use the Lost Password link to have your password emailed to you.  (You’ll get two emails… one asking if you really want to change your password, and another to reset the password.)

Professional Development Sign-Up

Once again, we’ll be using Moodle for Professional Development sign-ups.

Most of you have already logged into Moodle, but for those who haven’t or if you need a reminder, we have a couple of helpers for you:

For our veteran Moodle users, here’s the short story. Login and look for DeForest Area School District >> Professional Development >> Inservice Sign-Up. We are using  Choice activities for each type of professional development. Select & Save Choice to sign up. 

If you need help logging in, use the Lost Password link to have your password emailed to you.  (You’ll get two emails… one asking if you really want to change your password, and another to reset the password.)

Tuesday Tech Tip: Filter Overrides & YouTube Videos

Today’s tip will allow you to make your away through the tools Lightspeed provides to get access to web content you need.Access Denied

  • Have you ever been suddenly blocked from viewing sites you usually have access to (like YouTube)?
    Have you ever wanted to check out a site for possible student use or research?
  • Are you interested in being able to open a site for multiple computers in order to meet your instructional goals?

Here’s the full story on how to navigate Lightspeed.Educational Video Library

  • Do you want to allow students to see a specific YouTube video without seeing the comments and having full access to YouTube?

Here’s how to create a library of videos for students to view.

***If you’re interested in Moodle training on March 10, please let Christine know!***